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Making Sense of Security

FBI, This Week: Results of Money Mule Campaign Released

The FBI and its partners disrupted and prevented the illicit behavior of more than 600 money mules as part of a two-month long national campaign.


Audio Transcript

Mollie Halpern: The FBI and its partners disrupted and prevented the illicit behavior of more than 600 money mules as part of a two-month long national campaign.

Criminals looking to move stolen money recruit individuals through dating websites, online job announcements, emails, and other platforms.

Sometimes, money mules are not aware that they are part of a larger fraud scheme—and they become victims themselves.

Supervisory Special Agent James Abbott says unwitting money mules believe they are acting in good faith.

James Abbott: We’re trying to de-stigmatize the idea of being a victim. So, if there’s one thing to know, there’s no shame in being a victim. These criminals are very good at what they do and very good at preying on people. So, if you believe you are being used as a tool by these criminals, you are being used as a money mule, please reach out to law enforcement. You should reach out to your bank.

Halpern: During the campaign, law enforcement issued more than 500 warning letters notifying money mules that they are aiding and abetting criminals.

This year’s campaign coincided with Europol’s similar efforts to halt money mule activity.

Report money mule activity to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, or IC3, at ic3.gov or dial 1-800-CALL-FBI.

With FBI, This Week, I’m Mollie Halpern of the Bureau.

View Original Article HERE